I have no obligation to tolerate Nazis


I’ve posted this and other things like this on Facebook before, but it bears repeating. I’m going to mention this again (and again, and again, and again – as many times as necessary), as an avid WWII history buff, and as someone whose grandparents were heavily involved in the war effort at home. If you wave a fucking Nazi flag, throw a salute to Heil anyone, or try to claim anything about a superior race, we’re going to have words – strong words. I don’t have time for bullshit, and I certainly don’t have time to argue about why your widdle feelings got hurt and that’s why you started calling yourself a Nazi.

GET OUT. Stop trying to relive the Civil War or WWII, and pretend that the Nazis were just misunderstood, and that we can all wave second-place flags and pretend that words don’t have meaning, and we should all hug and sing Kumbayah like Daily Stormer doesn’t advocate violence and Richard Spencer’s “peaceful genocide” isn’t actually so bad. I don’t have to tolerate that shit and I won’t tolerate it. As soon as you advocate those things, tolerance is done – you have violated basic human decency, not to mention the social contract that we all abide by in not killing each other and burning each other’s homes down. I don’t have to tolerate that shit, just like you wouldn’t tolerate it if I walked over to your house and kicked your dog.

I’m reaching the end of my tolerance for bullshit, and while people are welcome to argue the finer points of National Socialism, they’re not welcome to come tell me why I need to tolerate some assholes with their Wal-Mart tiki torches crying that white people don’t get enough attention and that their tiny little snowflake egos need more stroking.

As Yonatan Junger states in his article on Tolerance, tolerance is a peace treaty but not a suicide pact.

Tolerance is not a moral absolute; it is a peace treaty. Tolerance is a social norm because it allows different people to live side-by-side without being at each other’s throats. It means that we accept that people may be different from us, in their customs, in their behavior, in their dress, in their sex lives, and that if this doesn’t directly affect our lives, it is none of our business. But the model of a peace treaty differs from the model of a moral precept in one simple way: the protection of a peace treaty only extends to those willing to abide by its terms. It is an agreement to live in peace, not an agreement to be peaceful no matter the conduct of others. A peace treaty is not a suicide pact.”

If one side decides not to live up to their end of the bargain, the other parties are not obligated to stand aside regardless of consequence and let those people trample on the treaty, and everyone else. When Nazis show up with torches and local militias bring guns to protests, they’re loudly proclaiming that they couldn’t care less about whatever social contract we think we’ve signed with everyone else. They only care about their feelings and their rights and their place in society, and they’re willing to trample (or shoot) anyone who believes differently. There’s no need to tolerate that, and it’s stupid to think anyone should. White Supremacists aren’t tolerating my right, as a mixed-ethnic woman, to live near them and work a high-paying job. In their eyes, my immigrant father stole his job from a more deserving white person, so everything I do and own was stolen from them. (See any number of articles about how immigrants steal jobs from white Americans. I’m sure the Daily Stormer is full of them, as is 4chan, reddit, and even twitter.)

I am under no obligation to tolerate such bullshit, and I won’t. I’ve listened to these people and frankly, all I hear is the sound of my grandparents spinning in their graves because we literally fought a war over this 70 years ago and they (and I) thought it was settled, that this was just isolated fringe making noise. Well, apparently it isn’t, but I have no inclination whatsoever to sit back and play, “But both sides…” or, “We should really take the high road.” Neville Chamberlain’s appeasement policies were wrong then, and they’re still wrong now.

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Photo Credits:

1. http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/politics/2017/08/tom_perriello_on_the_charlottesville_protests.html

2. http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/white-nationalist-rally-virginia-triggers-state-emergency-article-1.3405906

3. http://abcnews.go.com/US/violent-clashes-car-ramming-charlottesville/story?id=49187074

4. http://www.newyorker.com/news/as-told-to/a-witness-to-terrorism-in-charlottesville

5. http://mashable.com/2017/08/12/racist-march-charlottesville-scenes/#c57yUhCkxkqK

6. Inglourious Basterds (2009)

Two Things

  1. Given my last post, I’m thankful that no matter how bad of a day I’m having I’m not Anthony Scaramucci right now.
  2. Apparently, Jonah Goldberg (and The National Review as a whole) is a voice of reason now.

Yes, we are still living in a world where Trump is president. No, this is not an elaborate acid trip or fever dream. This is apparently reality, where Trump is leading our country, and his communications director is 1980’s Bone-itis Guy from Futurama.

What a time to be alive!

The Problem of Loyalty

Many people I know are mourning the upcoming inauguration. Trump has been elected, he’s readying his cabinet (oh god, the cabinet…), but the inauguration hasn’t even happened yet and even Krauthammer is saying The Honeymoon Is Over.

Look, I’m never going to like Donald Trump. I think he’s in the category for Top 5 Worst Presidents and he hasn’t even been elected yet. (That list, by the way, includes Richard Nixon, Andrew Johnson, and Herbert Hoover. Fill in your favorite for the other guy.) The man is the living embodiment to Millenial Crybaby Whining and he’s almost 70. The 3AM twitter rants, his “victory lap” around the US (did he even finish that? I don’t remember – maybe it was interrupted by a tweet-storm.), and his constant vacillation from one stance to another, really bothers the shit out of me. I mean, say what you will about Obama (and you will) at least he was predictable.

If you haven’t read Jonah Goldberg’s latest G-file, you should. He rightly points out one of the biggest problems facing America in general, but Conservatives and Trump’s administration in particular: emotional correctness. Trump’s biggest problem is that he demands loyalty at all costs. He wants yes-men, he wants his ideas supported, he wants his ego stroked, and he rewards that (much like any administration has) by giving sweetheart deals and cabinet positions to his most loyal supporters. Goldberg writes:

On the right, Never Trump has become a convenient psychological crutch for dismissing inconvenient arguments. Like the ever-metastasizing phrase “fake news,” it’s waved like a magic wand to make any threatening claim disappear without having to deal with it on the merits. Marxists used to use the term “false consciousness” in much the same way: to head-off threatening facts or arguments by attacking motives. When I point out that until a few months ago Republicans and conservatives despised crony capitalism or “picking winners and losers,” the instant reply amounts to: “When are you going to get over your Never Trump obsessions?” The upshot of all of these responses is “Get with the program,” “Get on board the Trump Train,” or “Get on the right side of history.”

Loyalty at all costs is the sign of a weak regime. Of groups and people who are afraid that their underlying ideology is so fragile that any negative comment, any questioning, even the whiff of insufficient enthusiasm, can cause it to come crumbling down. If we can’t question our own beliefs, how can we embrace them and make them stronger? I’ll borrow a quote from G.K. Chesterton here:

  • “What embitters the world is not excess of criticism, but an absence of self-criticism.”  – Sidelights on New London and Newer New York

We must be able to exercise self-criticism, and criticism of our heroes and leaders. We are not perfectly moral and righteous people (if we are, why do we still struggle with morality and righteousness?), and none of our ideals or leaders are either. If we place Trump beyond criticism, what happens when he does things that are truly wrong? We cannot simply sit back and pass off all criticism of our leaders as mere “Nobama” or “Never Trump” or “Killary” or whatever other epithet we choose to label it. We cannot move forward if we are closing our eyes to what is right in front of us and blindly pretending that it is glorious and golden.

Let us not also forget the history of dissent in this country – not just Alexander Hamilton and The Federalist Papers during the enlightenment, but even to the Puritans who dissented to English rule (much as I disagree with them), down through the numerous decades of journalistic dissent, popular dissent, protest…. Ideas don’t change and become better if you just accept the first version that comes across your desk.

I’ll leave you with a final thought in the form of a quote from Mr. Chesterton.

  • “I have formed a very clear conception of patriotism. I have generally found it thrust into the foreground by some fellow who has something to hide in the background. I have seen a great deal of patriotism; and I have generally found it the last refuge of the scoundrel.” – The Judgement of Dr. Johnson, Act III

Holi-daze

This is at the same time my favorite and least-favorite time of year. The holidays mean cooking, baking, cheesy music, and fancy decorations. Unfortunately, the holidays also mean stressful social situations, packed stores, and, for people with anxiety, feeling the crushing weight of inescapable social obligations (GIVE. ALL. THE. GIFTS!!!!!!!!). It also means melancholy remembrances of family members who have passed on or who are nearing the end of their lives. I’ve certainly been trying to avoid thinking about the impending doom of the upcoming Trumptacular inauguration. Further addendum, the people complaining about a War on Christmas are really missing the point. But whatever, I continue to celebrate Christmas in my own way anyway.

2017 remains a Schrodinger’s box – it is both an impending doom and not doom until such time as it actually happens, such that 2017 is either preparing a Challenge Accepted, Motherfucker, or a resigned Anything Is Better Than 2016. 2017 will surely be Yuge and Bigly, whatever the hell that means, but as long as J.K. Rowling is around it’ll be a bit more bearable.

So what are we looking forward to in 2017? Based on the drama of the post-election Cabinet selection process, we’re looking at a Republican-led Congress that has a laser-focus on spiting the Obama Legacy, even if it means cutting the noses off of their bigger old faces; an incoming President who has no idea what he’s doing and it packing his cabinet with cronies and billionaires and supporters (in other words: business as usual!); and a first family that has apparently been elected to do the President’s job while he runs his businesses. Good job, America. At least the press has finally woken up enough to realize that they maybe probably definitely fell down on the job with scrutinizing Trump during the primaries and the election (at least we hope they have), and many of his supporters are realizing that he’s a two-faced idiot who will say anything for attention (well, I HOPE they’re realizing that). The Hill even managed to narrow down the upcoming 100 days to only five major fights he’s going to have (I could have done it in one: all of them.) Even better, anti-Semitism is on the rise, so we can look forward to more of this crap (literally… unfortunately), and definitely more of these unintentional blunders: “…this Christmas heralds a time to celebrate the good news of a new King.” At least we finally know what Crow tastes like:

All in all, though, I’d say 2017 is going to be a good year for political bloggers, and I am gleefully looking forward to it. Yep, 2017 is going to be a hell of a year. Unfortunately.

Welcome Back

You may be wondering why I decided to restart my blog after a hiatus of nearly 6 years. I’m asking myself that as well, but some of you may have (correctly) guessed that the election had something to do with it. It did. The need to process my own thoughts and interact with people about ideas in a way that I don’t think is possible in the fleeting 140-character-limit format of Twitter, or the constantly-streaming format of Facebook. I’d been blogging since about 2000 before I gave it up because I was busy and it’s hard to be political when you’re a CPA and your entire job is all about being impartial and not offending clients by being too political. Or something like that. The epic buzzkill of trying to pass the CPA exam didn’t help either.

So here we are again, with a new blog, and a complete reset of my old domain. What happens next? Not with the blog – I mean with the country. The world. All that kind of stuff. Well, to put it bluntly, who the hell knows? But I want to document it and investigate it and understand it. I want to memorialize what I’m living through using more than just my private journal (speaking of which, y’all tried Morning Pages? It’s amazing.), or tracking my daily life and goals in a bullet journal (also totally recommend that). Journaling is fine, but it doesn’t talk back or help you work through to a better idea. So it’s back to blogging and politics and riling up both sides of the aisle.

What else can we do about the election results? Get involved. I don’t mean sharing memes on Facebook or tweeting at your Congressmember. Even sending a letter isn’t all that effective. What does work is calling your elected officials. Telling them directly what’s going on and what’s impacting you and what you want them to do about it. Democracy by representation in a republic like ours ONLY works if we hold our elected officials responsible. Show up at your local city council sessions – find out when they are and sit through them. All of them. Ask questions. Bring your neighbors, your kids, your friends. Did your council member run on a platform of building more parks? Ask them where the damn parks are. Hold them accountable for what they promised, and work through the issues with them.

When elections come around, vote. Campaign for your candidate. Knock on doors, make phone calls, hang banners, volunteer. That’s how we get our voices heard.